Power Flush Thatcham

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Thatcham is a historic market town and civil parish in the English county of Berkshire, 3 miles (5 kilometers) east of Newbury, 14 miles (24 kilometers) west of Reading, and 54 miles (87 kilometers) west of London.



We offer cleaning out limescale in your heating systems in these postcode areas:

  • RG18
  • RG19
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    HISTORY

    The area has evidence of prehistoric occupation and was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the strongest claimant to being the oldest continuously inhabited place in Britain.

    In its vicinity, the well-preserved remains of a mesolithic settlement dating from 8400 to 7700 BCE have been discovered. There is also evidence of Bronze and Iron Age settlements, as well as Romano-British activity.

    St. Thomas the Martyr Chapel, built around 1304
    Following the Norman Conquest, the name was slightly changed to Taceham in the Domesday Book of 1086, before going through several minor changes until the current form was adopted in the 16th century. Around 1304, the Chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr on the A4, now known as the Old Bluecoat School, was granted permission to hold services, the town experienced a period of great prosperity. The population was larger than that of Newbury at the time. The chapel is a Grade I listed structure. There is a Norman parish church of St. Mary, which was extensively rebuilt in 1857. This church is thought to have been built on the same site as an earlier Anglo-Saxon church. Previously, it was known as St. Luke’s. The church is a Grade II* listed structure.

    Henry I founded Reading Abbey in 1121 and endowed it with numerous gifts of land, including the Manor of Thatcham.

    At the same time, Thatcham Hundred was abolished, with the western portion transferred to Faircross Hundred and the remainder to the Hundred of Reading. Thatcham church, previously owned by the Diocese of Salisbury, was granted to Reading Abbey in 1141 by Empress Matilda, who also confirmed her father’s gift of the manor to the abbey. During World War II, Thatcham was home to one of the largest POW camps in the South, known as Camp 1001. Thatcham’s population increased rapidly in the second half of the twentieth century, rising from 5,000 in 1951 to 7,500 in 1961 to 22,824 in 2001.

    

    GEOGRAPHY

    Thatcham is located on the Kennet River, the Kennet and Avon Canal, and the A4. The parish currently encompasses the town of Thatcham, including the suburbs of Henwick, Dunston Park, and Colthrop, as well as the village of Crookham, which includes Crookham Common and the eastern ranges of the former RAF Greenham Common airfield. Midgham, Cold Ash, Ashmore Green, and Greenham were all part of the historic parish. [1] Thatcham Reed Beds, just south of town, is a Special Scientific Interest site (SSSI).

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