Power Flush Amersham

Powerflush nearby to Amersham



Amersham is a market town and civil parish in Buckinghamshire, England, located 27 miles (43 km) northwest of central London, 15 miles (24 km) from Aylesbury, and 9 miles (14 km) from High Wycombe. Amersham is located within the London commuter belt.

There are two distinct areas to consider:

Old Amersham, located in the Misbourne Valley, is home to the 13th-century parish church of St. Mary’s as well as several old pubs and coaching inns.

Amersham-on-the-Hill grew up in the early twentieth century around the Metropolitan Railway, which later became the Metropolitan line of the London Underground.



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  • HP6
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    HISTORY

    The name “Amersham” comes from the Old English for “Ealhmund’s village (hm).”

    Records go back to pre-Anglo-Saxon times, when it was known as Agmodesham, and by the time the Domesday Book was written around 1086, it had changed its name to Elmodesham. In 1460, there are two spelling variations: Agmondysham and Amytysham.

    The Domesday entry is as follows:

    Geoffrey de Mandeville is the owner of Amersham. It is the answer to 7+12 hides. Land for 16 ploughs; 2 hides in lordship; 3 ploughs there. There are 9 ploughs for 14 villagers and 4 smallholders, with an additional 4 ploughs possible. 7 slaves; a meadow for 16 ploughs; and 400 pigs in the woods. The total value is and was £9; prior to 1066, it was £16. This manor was owned by Queen Edith.

    Queen Edith was Edward the Confessor’s wife and King Harold’s sister, and after her death in 1075, the land passed to William the Conqueror, who granted it to Geoffrey de Mandeville (died c. 1100).

    His descendant Geoffrey de Mandeville (who became Earl of Essex in 1213) obtained a charter for Amersham in 1200, allowing him to hold a Friday market and a fair on September 7 and 8. Another charter was granted to Edward, Earl of Bedford in 1613, changing the market day to Tuesday and establishing a statute fair on September 19.

    Seven Lollard dissenters were burned at the stake in Amersham in 1521 (William Tylsworth, John Scrivener, Thomas Barnard, James Morden, Robert Rave, Thomas Holmes, and Joan Norman). In 1931, a memorial to them was erected, with the inscription: “Seven Protestants, six men and one woman, were burned at the stake in a shallow depression 100 yards to the left of this monument. They died for the principles of religious liberty, the right to read and interpret the Holy Scriptures, and the right to worship God according to their consciences as revealed by God’s Holy Word “.. According to the Universal Magazine for September 1749 (p. 139), ‘William Tylesworth’ was actually burned in 1506, and Thomas Bernard and James Morden (a labourer) were burned about two years later. 

    In 1841, the population was 3,098 people.

    

    GEOGRAPHY

    Old Amersham is located on the Misbourne Valley floor. This is a chalk stream that dries up on a regular basis. The river occupies a valley much larger than a river the size of the current River Misbourne can cut, making it an unsuitable stream. The valley floor is approximately 100m OD, while the valley top is approximately 165m OD. The valley was most likely formed under conditions similar to those required to form a dry valley. Amersham on the Hill is situated on a small plateau on the north side of the Misbourne valley, forming the watershed between the Misbourne and the nearby River Chess.

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