Power Flush Beaconsfield

Powerflush nearby to Beaconsfield



Beaconsfield is a market town and civil parish in Buckinghamshire, England, 23 miles (38 kilometers) west-northwest of central London and 16 miles (26 kilometers) south-southeast of Aylesbury. Gerrards Cross, Amersham, and High Wycombe are all within five miles (eight kilometers).

The town is near the Chiltern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and has a large area of Georgian, Neo-Georgian, and Tudor revival high street architecture known as the Old Town. It is well-known for having the world’s first model village as well as the National Film and Television School.

The Daily Telegraph named Beaconsfield ‘Britain’s richest town’ in 2008 (based on an average house price of £684,474).

In 2011, the post town had the highest proportion of £1 million-plus homes for sale in the UK (at 47 percent , compared to 3.5 percent nationally).

Burkes Road was named the second most expensive road in the country outside of London in 2011.



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    HISTORY

    Beaconsfield town and land primarily given over to arable farming comprise the parish. Some beech forest remains to supply High Wycombe’s established beech furniture industry, which manufactures modal and various artisan uses.

    Beaconsfield is recorded in 1185 property returns as Bekenesfeld, literally beechen field, which would be read less archaically as clearing in the beeches.

    Burnham Beeches is a nearby forest named after the beech genus. However, it is frequently incorrectly claimed that Beaconsfield got its name from a street called Beacon Hill in the neighboring village of Penn, which was a lookout point and beacon dating back to Saxon times. As the beacon was part of a chain from the naval base in Portsmouth to Butser Hill Hindhead, Hogsback, and Windsor, local men were called to defend an island fort.

    The parish church at the crossroads of Old Beaconsfield is dedicated to St Mary and was rebuilt in 1869 by the Victorians out of flint and bath stone. Beaconsfield’s United Reformed Church can trace its nonconformist worship roots back to 1704. Along a wide street of red brick houses and small shops in Old Beaconsfield, there are a number of old coaching inns. It was the first (coach) stop on the route between London and Oxford because it is equidistant between the two.

    The annual charter fair, which has been held every year since 1269, is celebrating its 750th year in 2019.

    The town was Benjamin Disraeli’s home constituency during the Victorian era, when he was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1868 and then again from 1874 to 1880. (in fact his home, Hughenden Manor is in the nearby town of High Wycombe). Queen Victoria made him the 1st Earl of Beaconsfield in 1876, and he was very popular with her. As a result, in the late Victorian era, Beaconsfield became a popular road name in industrial cities across the country.

    It is the final resting place of the author G. K. Chesterton, the poet Edmund Waller, and Edmund Burke, for whom a tall stone obelisk was erected over the tomb chest in St Mary and All Saints churchyard.

    Waller’s family purchased Wilton Manor and Hall Barn in the town in 1624.

    According to the Victoria County history of Buckinghamshire, “the Wallers, who came from Speldhurst, Kent, were settled at Beaconsfield as early as the 14th century.”

    Beaconsfield is home to Bekonscot model village, the world’s first model village, and Beaconsfield Film Studios, which has become the National Film and Television School, where many film directors (including Nick Park) and technicians have learned their trade. It is the birthplace of Terry Pratchett, the author of the Discworld fantasy novel series. Several scenes in Brief Encounter, a classic film about a woman in a boring middle-class marriage who nearly has an affair, were shot in the town: Station Parade served as Milford High Street, and Boots on Burke’s Parade was where Alec meets Laura. The exterior of the Royal Saracens Head Inn can be seen in the James Bond film Thunderball, and the Royal Standard pub was used to film the interior shots for the pub in Hot Fuzz. John & Julie and The Fast Lady are two other postwar color films that feature The New Town. Because of the old film studio and nearby Pinewood Studios, many other parts of town have been used in films. It has more recently been used as a “location” for the TV murder mystery series Midsomer Murders and the Inspector Morse spinoff Lewis.

    When the railway arrived at the turn of the twentieth century, the New Town was built one mile to the north. The station is on the Chiltern Main Line, which runs from Marylebone to High Wycombe and then branches to Aylesbury and Birmingham Snow Hill. Old Beaconsfield, which grew up along the Oxford Road to serve coach traffic, is mirrored by New Beaconsfield, which grew up around the station.

    Beaconsfield is also home to the Chiltern Shakespeare Company, which hosts amateur Shakespeare performances every year, the Beaconsfield Theatre Group (over 60 years old), the Beaconsfield Musical & Operatic Society (over 100 years old), and The Young Theatre (at Beaconsfield), a theatre company “run by young people for young people” and winners of the All British Festival of One Act Plays in 2004.

    In 1994, local pop band The Hit Parade released their single “On The Road To Beaconsfield,” a tribute to Enid Blyton and her life in the town.

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