Power Flush Cheshunt

Powerflush nearby to Cheshunt



Cheshunt is a town in the Borough of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, that is completely within the London Metropolitan Area and Greater London Urban Area. The area is located on the River Lea, Lee Navigation, and the New River.

Broxbourne is located on the town’s northern outskirts. Epping is located to the east. Its southern and western boundaries are formed by Waltham Cross and Goff’s Oak, respectively. Cheshunt is the most populous town in the borough of Broxbourne, with a population of 45,832 according to the 2011 census in the United Kingdom. 



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    HISTORY

    The Prime Meridian runs east of Cheshunt.

    The town name is derived from the Old English name for the area, Cestrehunt, which probably refers to a “castle, erected by the Romans,” the word cestre (along with the form ceastre), or even its modern forms, chester and caster, which are derived from the Latin castrum, which means “fort.”

    This is commemorated in the former Cheshunt urban district council’s arms.

    Cheshunt was a town on Ermine Street, a major Roman road leading north from London.

    Eddeva the Fair held the manor of Cheshunt prior to the Norman Conquest, but William I granted it to Alan of Brittany. The parish church of St Mary the Virgin was first mentioned in a 1146 charter, but it was completely rebuilt between 1418 and 1448, with a three-stage tower topped by an octagonal turret. 

    After leaving Queen Catherine Parr’s household in 1548, Queen Elizabeth I lived at Cheshunt in the care of Sir Anthony Denny as Princess Elizabeth.

    In 1712, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth Richard Cromwell died here. Cheshunt was also the site of the Cheshunt Railway in 1825. This 0.75 mi (1.21 km) horse-drawn line, which ran from the town’s High Street to the River Lea near the present-day Cheshunt railway station, was Hertfordshire’s first passenger-carrying monorail and the county’s first railway line.

    Cliff Richard used to live in the town’s Bury Green neighborhood. Lotus Cars and the central headquarters of the Debenhams store chain were previously located in Cheshunt, as was the headquarters of Tesco, the UK’s largest supermarket chain, until 2016. Cheshunt hosted the first officially licensed European BotCon convention in 2002.

    The government launched a review of how London was governed in 1957, led by Sir Edwin Herbert, who was appointed to create the new Greater London conurbation that exists today. Cheshunt was originally intended to be merged with the London Borough of Enfield; however, the plan was abandoned, and Cheshunt remained a part of Hertfordshire.

    Cheshunt was served by the Metropolitan Police Service until 2000, when it was taken over by Hertfordshire Constabulary.

    The Brookfield Centre, which houses Next, Boots, Argos, River Island, and Marks & Spencer stores, as well as a large Tesco Extra store, is one of the services available in Cheshunt. There was a Marriott Hotel nearby (which closed in 2020), and the town center has a diverse range of smaller shops.

    Cheshunt has access to the Lee Valley Park due to its location in the Lea Valley. The park is accessible from a variety of locations, including Windmill Lane, which is very close to the town’s railway station.

    A Consolidated B-24 Liberator bomber from the United States Army Air Forces 392nd Bombardment Group (Heavy), based at RAF Wendling, crashed next to Maxwells Farm, near Cheshunt, at 8:00 a.m. on August 12, 1944, killing all ten crew members.

    The section of the B198 near the crash site has been renamed Lieutenant Ellis Way in honor of the pilot who narrowly avoided collapsing into the nearby town. In 2010, one of the firefighters who responded to the scene secured funding for a permanent memorial at the scene (at the entrance to St Mary’s School). 

    Temple Bar was relocated from London at the turn of the nineteenth century and stood in Theobalds Park until 2004. Since then, the gateway has been re-erected in London at Paternoster Square, on the north side of St Paul’s Cathedral.

    Cedars Park, located on the site of Theobalds Palace, is a publicly owned park that includes a Great War memorial, bocce court, play maze, garden viewing mound, animal centre, tea room, and meeting room, as well as several palace remains. Since 2009, the park has received a Green Flag Award every year.

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