Power Flush Carlton in Lindrick

Powerflush nearby to Carlton in Lindrick



Carlton in Lindrick is a village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) north of Worksop. The parish population was 5,623 according to the 2011 Census, which included nearby Wallingwells.



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    HISTORY

    During King Stephen’s reign (1135–41), a Norman landholder named Ralph de Chevrolcourt (or Caprecuria) established and endowed a Benedictine priory of nuns in Carlton Park. It appears to have been constructed between 1140 and 1144. The priory was dedicated to St Mary the Virgin and was located next to a spring (“juxta fontes et rivum fontium”). It was officially known as St Mary in the Park, but it was more commonly known as the Priory of Wallingwells.

    By 1262, the priory had certain rights in the parish church of St John the Evangelist in Carlton, as well as St Wilfrid’s Church in Cantley, South Yorkshire, and All Saints in Mattersey. When Godfrey Ludham, Archbishop of York, granted the priory 18 bovates of land in Carlton parish, the nuns were very poor, and they remained poor, so that in 1273 St Wilfrid’s Cantley and its tithe income were also appropriated. Archbishop Godfrey’s successor, Walter Giffard, agreed to the grant and praised the nuns’ piety. According to a Taxation Roll from 1291, the Priory held temporalities at “Handsworth Woodhouses.”

    The priory is listed in Henry VIII’s Valor Ecclesiasticus of 1535 as having not only its rectories of Carlton and Cantley, as well as land at Handsworth, but also lands at Gildingwells, Gringley, and “Willourne.” The King’s agents, Thomas Legh and Richard Layton, visited the priory in 1536 and found no slander or scandal to report. Because it was a small religious house, it was scheduled to be dissolved under the Suppression of Religious Houses Act 1535, Parliament’s first act for the Dissolution of Monasteries. However, the prioress, Margaret Goldsmith, bought off the Crown officials with a payment equal to the priory’s annual income.

    Goldsmith deeded the priory and its estates to Richard Oglethorp for 21 years in June 1537, leaving only the priory church and buildings for the nuns to use. Parliament passed the Suppression of Religious Houses Act 1539 two years later. The Wallingwells Priory surrendered to the Crown in December of that year, pensioning off the prioress, her sub-prioress, and seven other nuns. There are no visible relics of the priory.

    The Carlton-in-Lindrick knight is a mounted bronze figurine from the 12th century that was discovered in 2004 and is now on display at the Bassetlaw Museum in Retford.

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