Power Flush Thame

Powerflush nearby to Thame



Thame is a market town and civil parish in Oxfordshire, approximately 13 miles (21 kilometers) east of Oxford and 10 miles (16 kilometers) southwest of Aylesbury. It gets its name from the River Thame, which runs through the town and forms part of the county border with Buckinghamshire. Moreton, a hamlet south of town, is included in the parish. The parish’s population was 11,561 according to the 2011 Census. Thame was established during the Anglo-Saxon period and was part of the kingdom of Wessex.



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    HISTORY

    Economic and social history

    The almshouses in Church Lane were built in 1550 by the courtier John Williams, 1st Baron Williams of Thame. He died in 1559, and his will provided for the establishment of the local grammar school. Its original structure, completed in 1569, is located next to the almshouses. The school relocated to its current location on Oxford Road in 1880. Lord Williams’ School was established as a comprehensive school in 1971.

    During the 1640s Civil War, Thame was occupied alternately by Royalists and Parliamentarians. Colonel John Hampden, who had attended the grammar school, died of his wounds at the house of Ezekiel Browne,[11] later to become the Greyhound Inn, after the Battle of Chalgrove Field in 1643.

    James Figg, the champion bare-knuckle boxer, was born in Thame in 1684 and began his career at the Greyhound Inn.

    The Greyhound Inn was renamed the James Figg in the twenty-first century, and a blue plaque commemorating him was unveiled in April 2011 by the Oxfordshire Blue Plaques Board.

    Many of the buildings on the boat-shaped High Street were refaced with modern facades made of locally produced salt glazed bricks in the 18th century. John Wesley preached in Thame late in the 18th century. On that particular occasion, the congregation was so large that the floor of the building gave way, and the crowd fell to the lower floor.

    Thame had a workhouse in Wellington Street by 1813. In 1826, John Boddington, a miller and the proprietor of Thame Mill, was appointed master of the workhouse. In 1831, his son, also named John Boddington, started working as a clerk at Strangeways Brewery in Manchester. Henry Boddington, born in Thame Mill in 1813, followed in his brother’s footsteps and joined the same brewery in 1832. Henry became a partner in the business in 1847 and sole proprietor in 1853, and the beers were renamed Boddingtons after him. The Oxfordshire Blue Plaques Board unveiled a blue plaque commemorating Henry Boddington’s association with the former workhouse in April 2011.

    Thame Poor Law Union was founded in 1835, and the following year, George Wilkinson designed a new workhouse on Oxford Road.

    In the twentieth century, the building housed Rycotewood College of Further Education. Oxford and Cherwell College, now City of Oxford College, was founded in 2003 in collaboration with two other colleges of further education.

    Thame railway station opened in 1862 as the temporary terminus of a Wycombe Railway extension from High Wycombe. When it reached Oxford in 1864, the extension was completed. British Railways discontinued passenger services between Princes Risborough and Oxford in 1963, and Thame station was closed, leaving Princes Risborough (7 miles) as the nearest passenger station until 1987. (see below) [19] The track between Thame and Morris Cowley was decommissioned by BR, but the line between Thame and Princes Risborough remained open for goods traffic to and from an oil depot in Thame.

    Thame Town Hall was built in 1888 and designed by HJ Tollit in the Jacobethan style.

    Willocks McKenzie, a local lorry driver, discovered a small hoard of late Medieval coins and rings alongside the River Thame in 1940. The coins were ten groats in value, and the rings were five ornate examples from the 14th to 16th centuries. The county Coroner ruled that they were a treasure trove and thus Crown property. The Crown loaned the hoard to the Ashmolean Museum on an indefinite basis. An ecclesiastical ring with a small reliquary was the most ornate. Its lid is adorned with a distinctive cross with two horizontal sections, similar to the Lorraine Cross. This cross was incorporated into the Thame Town Council’s emblem. 

    The M40 highway was extended from High Wycombe to Chilworth Farm in Great Milton in 1974. Junction 7 at Milton Common is about 3 miles (5 kilometers) southwest of Thame and provides the town with a quick road link to London. The M40 extension was completed in 1990, providing Thame with a quick road link to Birmingham.

    British Rail opened Haddenham and Thame Parkway station on the Chiltern Main Line in 1987, about 2 miles (3 kilometers) northeast of Thame. Chiltern Railways now connects the railway station to High Wycombe, London Marylebone, Banbury, and Birmingham Snow Hill. There is a large car park at the station, as well as a taxi office and regular buses into Thame.

    Thame oil depot closed in 1991, and BR demolished the railway between Thame and Princes Risborough. Sustrans was granted permission to re-use the former trackbed in order to build the Phoenix Trail, which is part of National Cycle Network route 57. Chiltern Railways considered reopening the rail line through Thame as part of their 2015 plan to open a direct rail route from London Marylebone to Oxford via Princes Risborough. The cost of reopening bridges was deemed prohibitively expensive.

    Bentley Productions frequently used Thame as a location for the drama series Midsomer Murders, representing the fictional town of Causton.

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