Power Flush Watlington

Powerflush nearby to Watlington



Watlington is a small market town and civil parish in Oxfordshire, about 7 miles (11 km) south of Thame, near the county’s eastern edge and less than 2 miles (3 km) from the Buckinghamshire border. The parish encompasses the Chiltern Hills hamlets of Christmas Common, Greenfield, and Howe Hill. The parish’s population was 2,727 according to the 2011 Census.



Check this out for cleaning out limescale in heating systems in these postcode areas:

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    HISTORY

    Because of the proximity of the Icknield Way, the Watlington area is likely to have been settled at an early date. The toponym, which means “settlement of Waecel’s people,” dates from the 6th century. In Watlington, a 9th-century charter by Thelred of Mercia records eight’manses,’ or major dwellings. The town was known as Watelintone or Watelintune in the Domesday Book of 1086. Cochynes-lane (Couching Street) and Brook Street are recorded in medieval documents, indicating that the modern street plan existed in the 14th century. 

    Watlington has had inns since the 15th century, according to historical records. The town’s market was listed as taking place on a Saturday in 1722. By the end of the 18th century, the town had six inns, all of which were purchased within the next few years by the Haywards, a local brewing family. The number of licensed premises increased until late in the nineteenth century, when a Methodist named George Wilkinson purchased six of them and closed them down. Watlington now has three remaining public houses: The Spire & Spoke (ex-Carriers Arms), The Chequers, and The Fat Fox Inn. During the English Civil War, Parliamentarian troops were billeted at Watlington. It is believed that John Hampden spent the night before the Battle of Chalgrove Field in the town.

    Thomas Stonor paid for the construction of Watlington Town Hall in 1664–65. Stonor endowed its upper room as a grammar school for boys, and Dame Alice Tipping of Ewelme added to the endowment in 1731 to increase the number of students. The town Vestry established a National School in 1842, which shared the same rooms in the town hall as the town hall. A National School for Girls was built next to St Leonard’s church in 1843. The boys’ and girls’ schools were merged in 1872 to form a new Board school, which, like its predecessors, was affiliated with the National Society for Promoting Religious Education. The school was divided into junior and senior schools in 1927. In 1956, a new secondary school, the Icknield School, opened for senior students, and the primary school moved into the old building. Icknield Community College replaced the Icknield School.

    The town hall, which was no longer used as a school, was in disrepair by 1895. It was restored by public subscription in 1907. It is a landmark in the town center, at the intersection of three roads. Watlington has been twinned with the French town of Mansle in the Poitou-Charentes region since 1990. The Watlington Hoard, a collection of silver items dating back to Alfred the Great’s reign in the ninth century, was rediscovered in Watlington in 2015 by James Mather, an amateur metal detectorist. The hoard was later excavated and purchased for £1.35 million by the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

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