Power Flush Woodstock

Powerflush nearby to Woodstock



Woodstock is a market town and civil parish in Oxfordshire, England, located 8 miles (13 km) north-west of Oxford. The parish population was 3,100 according to the 2011 Census. Blenheim Palace, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is located in the parish of Blenheim, near Woodstock. Winston Churchill was born in the palace in 1874 and is buried nearby in the village of Bladon. On June 15, 1330, King Edward III’s elder son and heir apparent, Edward, was born in Woodstock Manor. During his lifetime, he was known as Edward of Woodstock, but today he is known as the Black Prince. Elizabeth, her half-sister, was imprisoned in the gatehouse of Woodstock Manor during the reign of Queen Mary I.



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    HISTORY

    The name Woodstock is derived from Old English and means “clearing in the woods.” Woodstock (Wodestock, Wodestok, Wodestole) is described as a royal forest in the Domesday Book of 1086. Thelred the Unready, King of England, is said to have convened an assembly at Woodstock and issued the IX thelred legal code. It’s possible that King Henry I kept a menagerie in the park. Rosamund Clifford was courted by King Henry II at Woodstock (Fair Rosamund). When King Henry II granted Woodstock a Royal charter in 1179, he established the town’s market.  The Bear Hotel, located on Park Street across from the Oxfordshire Museum, dates back to the 13th century.

    Woodstock is described as a vill in the Hundred Rolls of 1279, but a burgess is mentioned in the same document, and it returned two members to parliament as a borough in 1302 and 1305. The earliest known municipal charter is that of Henry VI in 1453, which established the vill of New Woodstock as a free borough with a merchant guild and incorporated the burgesses under the title of “Mayor and Commonalty of the Vill of New Woodstock.” The borough was exempt from sending representatives to parliament until the 16th century, when it began to return two members.

    Woodstock Palace, located near the village, was a favorite of several English kings throughout the medieval period. During the English Civil War, the structure was destroyed. The palace ruins were cleared 60 years later to make way for the construction of Blenheim Palace. The town prospered by making gloves beginning in the 16th century. When the 1st Duke of Marlborough became a permanent resident in the 17th century, the town underwent significant change. By 1720, the town had a thriving fine steelwork industry, and by 1742, its products were of sufficient quality to be considered viable diplomatic gifts.  Cut steel jewelry had evolved by the end of the 18th century. Today, it relies heavily on tourists, many of whom visit Blenheim Palace.

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