Power Flush Rotherham

Powerflush nearby to Rotherham



Rotherham is a large market town and cathedral in South Yorkshire, England. The town gets its name from the Rother River, which merges with the Don River. The Don River then runs through the town center. It is the main settlement of Rotherham Metropolitan Borough. Rotherham is also the third largest settlement in South Yorkshire, following Sheffield and Doncaster.

Glass manufacturing and flour milling were two traditional industries. It was also known as a coal mining town and a contributor to the steel industry during the industrial revolution.

Yorkshire is the town’s historic county. From 1889 to 1974, the ridings of the County of York became counties in their own right, with the West Riding of Yorkshire serving as the town’s county and South Yorkshire serving as its current county.

According to the 2011 census, the population of Rotherham was 109,691. The borough, which is governed from the town, had a mid-2019 estimated population of 265,411, making it England’s 60th most populous district.



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    HISTORY

    History from the beginning
    Iron Age and Roman settlements have been discovered in the district’s boundaries. This includes a small Roman fort in the upper flood meadow of the Don at Templeborough to the south-west.

    Rotherham was established in the early Middle Ages. Its name is derived from the Old English word hm, which means “homestead on the Rother.” The river name derives from the Brittonic words for’main river,’ ro- ‘over, chief,’ and dur ‘water.’ East Sussex is home to another river known as the Rother. The Anglo-Saxon settlement, complete with an ecclesiastical parish, was founded on a Roman road’s ford over the River Don and the surrounding area.

    The manor was previously held by Lord Hakon in 1066 and was tenant of William the Conqueror’s half-brother overlord, Robert de Mortain, according to the 1086 Domesday Book. The most inhabited manor was held by an absentee lord in 1086, Nigel Fossard, and today’s town area includes eight outlying Domesday estates. There were eight adult male householders counted as villagers, three smallholders and one priest, three ploughlands tilled by one lord’s plough team and two and a half men’s plough teams active, and three ploughlands tilled by one lord’s plough team and two and a half men’s plough teams active. The manor also had a church, four acres of meadow, and seven acres of woodland. Rotherham owned a mill worth half a pound sterling.

    His successors, the De Vesci family, rarely visited the town and did not construct a castle, but they did keep a Friday market and a fair going. During a period of increasing wealth in the church, John de Vesci and Ralph de Tili gave all their possessions in Rotherham to Rufford Abbey in the mid-13th century. The monks collected tithes from the town in exchange for an extra market day on Monday and the right to extend the annual fair from two to three days. 

    Rotherham residents formed the “Greaves of Our Lady’s Light,” an organization that collaborated with the town’s three guilds. It was suppressed in 1547 but resurrected in 1584 as the feoffees of Rotherham common lands, and it still exists today.

    In the 1480s, the Rotherham-born Archbishop of York, Thomas Rotherham, instigated the establishment of a College of Jesus or Jesus College, Rotherham to compete with Cambridge and Oxford. It was the first brick building in South Yorkshire, and it taught theology, religious chant and hymns, grammar, and writing.

    Rotherham was an enviable and modern town at the turn of the 16th century, thanks to the College and the new parish church of All Saints. The college was dissolved in 1547 during the reign of Edward VI, and its assets were taken by the crown to be distributed to its supporters. On College Street, very little of the original structure remains. Part of the walls of the College of Jesus are encased within numbers 23, 2A, 4, (later for a time Old College Inn, a beerhouse), 6, and 8 Effingham Street. In 1879, a doorway was saved from demolition and relocated to nearby Boston Park. Fragments of walls are the earliest surviving brick structure in South Yorkshire, and they are the remains of a key institution in Rotherham’s development into a regionally significant town. Sixty years after the College’s dissolution, a wealthy visitor described Rotherham as having deteriorated from a fashionable college town to having admitted gambling and vice. The name Thomas Rotherham College honors Thomas Rotherham’s history and education in the town.

    

    GEOGRAPHY

    The town is built on the slopes of two hills: one in the west marks the beginning of a 3 mile (4.8 km) north-west crest topped by Keppel’s Column, and one in the east marks the beginning of a narrower crest alongside the Rother known as Canklow Hill, topped by a protected formally laid out public area, Boston Park, less than 500 metres east of and 80 metres above the Rother. The Rother here is 32 to 34 meters above sea level. The south scarp is slightly higher still, the Canklow Hill Earthworks, a Scheduled Ancient Monument and one of the borough’s few pre-dating recorded history.

    Rotherham’s commercial town center is located in the valley between these hills on the navigable section of the River Don, which flows from the south-west after turning roughly due north. The town center is located less than 0.5 mile (0.80 km) below and north of the confluence of the Rother, which flows from the south. The Mid Don Valley extends north of the Metropolitan Borough into neighboring towns.

    Beyond the town center and away from the Don Valley, the Rotherham district is largely rural, with a mix of retired people, larger properties, some farming and tourism, and the landscaped Wentworth Woodhouse estate, which houses the Rockingham Pottery’s last surviving kiln.

    Aside from two regular roads and two bypasses (one of which is the motorway network), Sheffield is directly connected by the Trans Pennine Trail, which passes the Meadowhall shopping centre on both sides (which between the two places) as a southern detour.

    Many towns and suburbs in South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire are all stops on Rotherham’s railway – it is Doncaster that has the East Coast Main Line providing express intercity services.

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