Power Flush Alcester

Powerflush nearby to Alcester



Alcester is a market town and civil parish in Warwickshire, England, located at the confluence of the rivers Alne and Arrow in the Stratford-on-Avon District, approximately 8 miles (13 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon and 7 miles south of Redditch, close to the Worcestershire border. The population was 6,273 according to the 2011 census.



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  • B49
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    HISTORY

    Alcester was founded as a walled fort by the Romans around AD 47. The military camp gave rise to the walled colonia known as Alauna. It was built on Icknield Street (or Ryknild Street), a Roman road that ran from southwest England to south Yorkshire. The town was also located just north of the Fosse Way, another important Roman British thoroughfare. Alauna, a thriving market town, was located within the commercial sphere of Salinae (modern-day Droitwich Spa), where rock salt and brine were extracted and processed. Archaeological research has revealed that the colonia had streets, temples, and workshops. Local businessman B.W. Davis initiated research into Alcester’s Roman history in the 1920s. Recent excavations have revealed that in the third century AD, a significant portion of the Roman town was built outside its defensive walls.

    Alencestre had developed into an Anglo-Saxon market town in the Kingdom of Mercia by the early mediaeval period.

    Alcester Abbey, a Benedictine monastery founded in 1138 by Ralph le Boteler, was also located in the town. The last abbot, Richard de Tutbury, resigned in 1467, and Alcester Abbey was absorbed into the neighbouring Evesham Abbey. Alcester Abbey was in ruins by 1515 as a result of various abbots’ neglect, and it was later largely demolished during Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries. The ruins were given to the local Greville family, who used a large portion of the stone to rebuild their family seat, Beauchamp Court.

    Today, the town’s architecture spans the Medieval, Tudor, Georgian, Victorian, and twentieth centuries. The Old Malthouse on the corner of Church Street and Malt Mill Lane appears to be the oldest house, dating from around 1500. The clock at St Nicholas’ Church (Grade 2*) is unusually placed on the south-west corner of the 14th-century tower, so that it can be seen from the High Street. The church also houses the tomb of Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke’s grandfather. The Georgian nave of the church, with Doric columns and a plastered ceiling, is thought to have been designed by Francis Smith of Warwick, who oversaw its rebuilding by the Woodward brothers of Chipping Campden in 1729.

    The Town Hall in Alcester was built between 1618 and 1641 and is grade I listed.

    As part of the Platinum Jubilee Civic Honours, Alcester will compete for city status.

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