Power Flush Coleshill

Powerflush nearby to Coleshill



Coleshill is a market town in the North Warwickshire district of Warwickshire, England, named after the Cole River, which runs through it. It has a population of 6,481 people and is located 10 miles (16 kilometres) east-northeast of Birmingham, 8.5 miles (13.7 kilometres) southeast of Sutton Coldfield, 11 miles (18 kilometres) south of Tamworth, and 12.5 miles (20.1 kilometres) northwest of Coventry.



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    HISTORY

    Coleshill got its start in the Iron Age, prior to the Roman conquest of 43 AD, at the Grimstock Hill Romano-British settlement north of the River Cole. Archaeologists discovered evidence of hut circles at the end of the 1970s. These excavations revealed that a Romano-Celtic temple existed on Grimstock Hill throughout the Roman period. It evolved from earlier Iron Age huts and went through at least three stages of development. The area was at the crossroads of two powerful Celtic tribes: the Coritanii from Leicester to the east, and the Cornovii from Viroconium Cornoviorum to the west.

    Coleshill’s nucleus moved about a kilometre to the south, to the top of the hill, during the post-Roman or Arthurian period (The Dark Ages). The current church is located here, and the mediaeval town grew up around it. By 1066, the town was a Royal Manor held by King Edward the Confessor, and it is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as land held by William the Conqueror and the site of the ancient hundred of Coleshill’s court. [5] In 1284/5, King Henry II granted John de Clinton, elder, Coleshill Manor, which he claimed by prescription within the lordship of Coleshill, as well as an Assize of bread and ale, gallows, pillory, tumbrell and court leet, infangthef and utfangthef, a market, fair, and free warren. He passed away in 1316. His 12-year-old grandson, John, became his heir and married a daughter of Sir Roger Hilary before dying in 1353 or 1354, leaving one daughter Joan. Sir John de Montfort, the illegitimate son of Sir Peter de Montfort of Beaudesert, was her first husband. Coleshill Manor was then passed down to this branch of the de Montford family, who moated the manor houses at Coleshill and Kingshurst. Following the execution and forfeiture of Sir Simon de Montford for supporting Perkin Warbeck’s rebellion, King Henry VII granted Coleshill Manor and its lands to Simon Digby in 1496. The titles are still held by descendants of the (Wingfield-Digby) family.

    King John granted a market charter to Coleshill village, along with Liverpool, Leek, and Great Yarmouth, in 1207.

    Coleshill became an important staging post on the coaching roads from London to Chester, Liverpool, and Holyhead during the era of coaching and turnpike trusts. The town had over twenty inns at one point. The Coleshill to Lichfield Turnpike was built in 1743.

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